Muskoka To-DAILY

Record snowfall of 212 cms in Muskoka in December; and coldest month since 2000

MUSKOKA –  Winter definitely came in like a lion in December.

A record snowfall in December has been a problem for many clearing snow off sidewalks, drives, roads and even roofs - and even included one death this week in Haliburton after a roof collapsed on a woman, 64.

A record snowfall in December has been a problem for many clearing snow off sidewalks, drives, roads and even roofs – and even included one death this week in Haliburton after a roof collapsed on a woman, 64.

Muskoka set a new maximum snowfall amount last month with a total of 212 centimetres.

There hasn’t been this much snow fall here in the first month of winter since 2008.

And cold? It’s been colder, too – by almost 3 degrees C on average.

Environment Canada says we got a green Christmas because we had almost three times the normal amount of snow. Normally we see 87 cms in Decmeber.

That means we had 124 cms more than normal.

Five years ago we got 211 cms.

As for the temperature, December’s Muskoka mean temperature was -9.4.

Normally it’s -6.6, a difference of -2.8 degrees, says Geoff Coulson, warning preparedness meteorologist for Environment Canada.

In his monthly report Monday, Coulson says the bitter cold, an ice storm and snow are on Ontarians’ minds when looking back at December 2013.

He says it was colder than normal across the province, but the real story lies in the unrelenting cold in Northern Ontario, where the mean temperatures last month were colder than normal by as much as 7.2 degrees Celsius!

Records were set for the mean temperatures in December in Sioux Lookout, Dryden, Kenora and Thunder Bay. Another indication of the brutal cold was reflected in the number of days with minimum temperatures below -30.0 °C.

According to the 1971-2000 figures for December, Sioux Lookout normally has 4.6 days on which the minimum temperature dips below -30°C, while Dryden has 3.3 days, Kenora 2.4 and Thunder Bay 1.5.  This December, those locations saw 11, 7, 7, and 9 days, respectively. In Thunder Bay, a record was set for the extreme minimum temperature for any day in December at -39.8°C on December 31.  The former extreme minimum temperature for that location in December was -37.8°C, established on December 13, 1976.

Meanwhile, Coulson says in the following report that precipitation was within average amounts for most of the province. Locations in the northwest, the eastern shores of Lake Superior, Wiarton and parts of southwestern Ontario did receive above-normal amounts. Given the frigid temperatures, it was no surprise that the rainfall amounts were lower than normal and the snowfall amounts were above normal.

Many locations received 1.5 to 1.8 times the snowfall amount expected for December.

Severe Weather

Early December was marked by a moisture-laden autumn storm which crossed Lake Superior during the night of December 4-5. Regions to the north and west of Lake Superior received 10 to 20 centimetres of snow, while northeastern Ontario received between 3 to 9 hours of freezing rain or drizzle.

The period from December 6-12 was a particularly snowy one for locales near and east of Georgian Bay as a persistent westerly wind set the stage for a multi-day snow squall event. Twice during this period, a particular squall extended as far inland as the Ottawa area and eastern Ontario, where snow squalls are seldom observed.

While the most persistent squalls did not directly affect Environment Canada’s monitoring stations, snow accumulations upwards of 40 centimetres in the affected area were widespread. Coldwater, Haliburton and Sandfield (ManitoulinIsland) reported 60.2, 54.6 and 60 centimetres of snow, respectively, that were associated with this multi-day event. Muskoka reported the highest snow accumulation for the week with a whopping 128 centimetres of fresh snow.

During the weekend leading to Christmas (December 20-22), southern Ontario was hit by two significant storm systems from Texas. This left a large swath of southern Ontario in the dark, as 20-30 millimetres of ice accumulated on trees, roads and outdoors surfaces. This significant amount of ice resulted in widespread power outages, trees and tree limbs down and very icy roads.

The areas receiving the biggest impact ranged from north of London through Kitchener into the Golden Horseshoe, then east along the north shore of Lake Ontario, and up the St. Lawrence to Cornwall. It took until the end of the month for some customers to have their power restored. This event was one of the most significant ice storms in recent years in terms of the size of the area impacted and the number of customers left without power.

Parts of southern Ontario north of this area received a mixture of snow, ice pellets and freezing rain, with snow and ice pellets’ accumulation in the range of 10 to 15 centimetres with each system. Ottawa airport reported the highest snowfall amount (18 centimetres) with this multi-day event. For extreme southwestern Ontario and regions just north of Lake Erie, rainfall warnings were issued (rainfall warnings are issued in winter when 25 millimetres of rain are expected in 24 hours).

The rainfall amounts reported ranged mainly from 40 to 50 millimetres, with the highest amount over the three days being 72 millimetres at the Port Colborne observation site.

Record low mean temperature readings (in °C), ranked by variation from normal:

Location

Mean Temp

Normal

Difference

Previous Record

Sioux Lookout

-22.2

-15.0

-7.2

 -22.2 (1976) (tied)

Dryden

-21.4

-14.5

-6.9

 -20.8 (1976)

Kenora

-20.5

-14.1

-6.4

 -20.0 (1976)

Thunder Bay

-18.0

-11.6

-6.4

 -17.9 (1989)

Unusual mean temperature readings (in °C), ranked by variation from normal:

Location

Mean Temp

Normal

Difference

Coldest since

RedLake

-22.4

-16.2

-6.2

1989

Geraldton

-20.6

-14.8

-5.8

2000

PickleLake

-23.3

-17.9

-5.4

1989

Chapleau

-17.0

-11.8

-5.2

1989

Timmins

-18.4

-13.2

-5.2

1989

Kapuskasing

-19.3

-14.3

-5.0

1989

Wawa

-15.3

-10.3

-5.0

1989

Sault Ste. Marie

-11.0

-6.3

-4.7

1989

Sudbury

-13.8

-9.5

-4.3

2000

North Bay

-13.1

-9.1

-4.0

2000

Earlton

-16.0

-12.1

-3.9

1989

Moosonee

-20.0

-16.3

-3.7

1989

Muskoka

-9.4

-6.6

-2.8

2000

Kingston

-5.9

-3.2

-2.7

2000

Wiarton

-5.9

-3.3

-2.6

2000

Ottawa

-9.6

-7.1

-2.5

2000

TorontoCity

-2.9

-0.9

-2.0

2000

Record high snowfall readings (in cm), ranked by variation from normal:

Location

Snowfall

Normal

Difference

Previous Record

Muskoka

212.0

87.6

124.4

211.0 (2008)

Unusual snowfall readings (in cm), ranked by variation from normal:

Location

Snowfall

Normal

Difference

Most snow since

Ottawa

88.4

57.2

31.2

2012

Thunder Bay

73.4

44.1

29.3

1992

Windsor

54.2

30.1

24.1

2008

Sioux Lookout

52.4

32.8

19.6

2005

Kenora

46.0

27.4

18.6

2004

 

Short URL: http://www.muskokatodaily.com/?p=17688

Posted by on Jan 13 2014. Filed under Headlines. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed

Search Archive

Search by Date
Search by Category
Search with Google

Your Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty

 

Log in | Designed by Muskoka Graphics
Posts Protect Plugin by http://blog.muffs.ru