Muskoka To-DAILY

In case you forgot – July wasn’t so hot, EnviroCan rubs it in

MUSKOKA — As if you need proof — that July was “a bit on the cool and wet side of normal….”

Muskoka’s mean temperature last month was 16.7 — and normally it’s 17.5).

But the good news is the precipitation was 83.9 mm — and normally it’s 93.4 mm falls.

That’s according to the Geoff Coulson, Environment Canada warning preparedness meteorologist with his Ontario monthly report.

What, no 30-degree days? My tomatoes – o’ the humanity!

What’s a 10-year-old supposed to do — might as well stay in school where’s it’s air conditioned.

Coulson confirms — “July was cold and wet for most of Ontario.”

Thanks for the news flash, Geoff.

Overall, he says “July 2014 sets itself apart due to the absence of any heat wave.”

Say it ain’t so, Geoff.

The mean temperatures for July were, for many locations, colder or very close to those of June. The largest departures from normal values were seen in the Golden Horseshoe, eastern Ontario, northeastern Ontario and North of Superior. This was most pronounced in Wawa and Windsor, where for each it was the third coldest since recordings first began in those locations, back in the 1940s.

And — surprise — the rainfall amounts received last month were above normal values for locations throughout the province, except for North of Superior and parts of northeastern Ontario (lucky them?).

In fact, for Moosonee it was the second wettest July on record, with observations beginning at that location in 1932. (Oh, joy.)

Severe Weather

Five more tornadoes were added to the list for Ontario this month. Fortunately, most were short-lived and weak, but the last one caused quite notable damage.

The first tornado of the month occurred during the afternoon of July 7 in the Norwich area to the south of Woodstock. The tornado lasted only a brief time and stayed out over an open field, so no noteworthy damage occurred. It was rated as an Enhanced Fujita Scale Zero (EF0) tornado, with winds of at least 90 kilometres per hour.

The next two tornadoes occurred near North Bay during the evening of July 15. The first was a waterspout or tornado over water, sighted in eastern Lake Nipissing. Waterspouts that are associated with thunderstorms occurring over inland lakes are included in the Ontario tornado count. The waterspout did not come on shore and no damage was reported, so it was rated as an EF0 tornado, with winds of at least 90 kilometres per hour. The next tornado occurred just to the south of the North Bay airport. Again, no damage was reported, and so this event was also rated as an EF0 tornado.

During the evening hours of July 27, two tornadoes occurred in southwestern Ontario. The first occurred near the small community of Millbank, northwest of Kitchener. It was short-lived and did no appreciable damage, so was rated as an EF0 tornado. The second event was the most significant tornado of the month. It occurred just to the south of Grand Bend, near the shores of Lake Huron. The tornado moved inland from the lake and demolished a number of trees. The tornado had a maximum width of 800 metres and a length of some 7.5 kilometres. It was rated as a high-end EF1 tornado with peak winds between 155 and 175 kilometres per hour. A woman was seriously injured in PineryProvincialPark from this event due to a tree falling on her.

Courlson says there were also other noteworthy events occurring elsewhere during the month:

On the afternoon of July 1st a storm affected parts of southern RenfrewCounty, which as it crossed the Ottawa River into Quebec caused significant tree damage in the vicinity of FitroyHarbour, and more substantial damage on the Quebec side in the small town of Quyon.

At approximately 4 p.m. EDT on July 6, a severe thunderstorm to the south of Thunder Bay produced hail the size of golf balls, causing some significant crop damage.

Heavy thunderstorms caused large downpours to parts of southwestern Ontario during the early morning hours of July 7. The Wellesley area to the northwest of Kitchener recorded the highest amounts – some 79 millimetres – while other places in and around Kitchener-Waterloo recorded 50 to 60 millimetres.

Another band of strong thunderstorms moved through northwestern Ontario during the afternoon and early evening of July 12. Some of these storms produced bursts of damaging winds. The strongest wind gust reported from these storms occurred in Dryden, with a speed of 122 kilometres per hour. RedLake and Sioux Lookout reported peak gusts of 90 and 80 kilometres per hour, respectively. Fortunately, no widespread damage was reported from these winds.

 

Unusual mean temperature readings (in °C), ranked by variation from normal*:
         

Location

Mean Temp

Normal

Difference

Coldest since

Sioux Lookout

15.8

18.6

-2.8

2009

Wawa

12.5

14.8

-2.3

1992

Kingston

19.1

21.4

-2.3

2009

Sault Ste. Marie

15.4

17.6

-2.2

2009

Windsor

20.6

22.7

-2.1

1992

Sudbury

16.9

19.0

-2.1

2009

Hamilton

18.8

20.8

-2.0

2009

Wiarton

16.6

18.6

-2.0

2009

 

 

 

 

 

Unusual precipitation readings (in mm), ranked by variation from normal*:
 

 

 

 

 

Location

Precipitation

Normal

Difference

Driest since

Sault Ste. Marie

42.7

76.8

-34.1

2010

Wawa

72.0

101.5

-29.5

2011

Geraldton

86.4

111.7

-25.3

2012

 

 

 

 

 

Location

Precipitation

Normal

Difference

Wettest since

Moosonee

185.4

101.3

84.1

1986

Kapuskasing

175.6

100.5

75.1

2013

Kitchener/Waterloo

155.4

91.8

63.6

2008

Hamilton

133.2

86.5

46.7

2009

Peterborough

107.2

66.7

40.5

2009

Sioux Lookout

124.4

85.3

39.1

2010

Trenton

88.3

56.1

32.2

2011

London

109.7

82.2

27.5

2010

 

* Climate Normals for the period 1971-2000

Short URL: http://www.muskokatodaily.com/?p=19228

Posted by on Aug 14 2014. Filed under Headlines. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed

Search Archive

Search by Date
Search by Category
Search with Google

Recent Comments

    Your Shopping Cart

    Your cart is empty

     

    Log in | Designed by Muskoka Graphics
    Posts Protect Plugin by http://blog.muffs.ru